June 27, 2017

Massive cyberattack / Human plague / Grounded

MASSIVE CYBERATTACK.
Developing: Mass disruption reported in Europe by an assault one government official calls “unprecedented.”

TRUMP’S BIGGEST WIN? FiveThirtyEight’s Oliver Roeder and Harry Enten say that, based on the latest round of Supreme Court rulings, the president’s appointment of Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court “has paid dividends … more than perhaps any other move the president has made.”
What the court’s ruling on the travel ban means for immigrants.
Dueling takes on the court’s First Amendment calls: A declaration that “people of faith aren’t second-class citizens”? Or an “incredible privileging of religion”?

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HUMAN PLAGUE. Three cases have been reported in New Mexico.
The mom of a boy with a rare genetic disease has been tweeting the hospital bill: “Without insurance we would owe $231,115.”
The Congressional Budget Office pegs the number of Americans who’d lose health insurance over the next decade under the Senate plan at 22 million.
… Including almost 655,000 in Illinois.
A key Republican says she’ll vote against the plan.
Republicans have penciled in a provision to discourage healthy people from waiting until they get sick to buy insurance—but at least one critic warns the real impact could be to keep “sick people from getting care immediately after signing up.”

CNN RESIGNATIONS. A reporter and two editors have quit in the aftermath of a story the network retracted.
And President Trump has been gleeful on Twitter.

ANSWER TO HIS PRAYERS.
In 2009, 15,000 Americans a day were losing their jobs. But, The Guardian reports, that’s the year the man who’s now Trump’s lawyer, Jay Sekulow, approved plans to encourage poor and jobless people to donate money to his Christian nonprofit—which has steered millions of dollars to Sekulow, his family and their businesses. Experts in nonprofit law have questions.
Trump, leader of the world’s oldest democracy, yesterday welcomed the leader of the world’s largest democracy—and, while praising himself for accountability, refused to take reporters’ questions.

‘IT DOESN’T TAKE MUCH TO FIGURE OUT THAT SOMEONE … LEAVING WITHOUT A RECEIPT WITH A MACHETE AND KNIFE IS NOT GOING TO BE UP TO ANYTHING GOOD.’
A lawyer for the family of an Uber driver killed on the job is suing Walmart on grounds it let the suspect get away with weapons used in the murder.
After a fatal shooting, Chicago aldermen are moving ahead with a plan to close the Ohio Street underpass to and from the lakefront overnights from April to October.
Chicago cops tell stories of their work to a veteran police reporter: “I can shoot you in the back. The law authorizes us to do that..”

GROUNDED. A professor who’s used the domain Untied.com (“An Evil Alliance Member”) to collect complaints about United Airlines has lost a lawsuit in Canadian court.
And now the website’s seeking donations to finance its appeal.

YOUR TAX DOLLARS AT WORK. OR NOT.
The Chicago School Board’s latest two loans come with a steep price: $70,000 a day in interest.
 Developing: Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan promises to unveil a state budget proposal today.
Better Government Association policy director Madeleine Doubek calls for video streaming of City Council committee meetings, “where most of the nitty-gritty work and debate on ordinances occurs.”
The mayor of a small suburb is defending the millions his town takes in from red-light camera violations.

‘HE CHANGED THE GAME FOREVER. AND HE’S STILL PLAYING.’ The Tribune’s Rick Kogan catches up with 90-year-old political comedian Mort Sahl, “the comic who started the revolution.”
 A look at Sen. (and former Saturday Night Live cast member) Al Franken’s “devastating strategy for taking on Trump’s team of climate science deniers.”

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